Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

gadgets

nse ticker

NSE Ticker is useful for Stock Exchange Live Feeds.National Stock Exchange (NSE) India offers live feed on Mobile site, that provides minute to minute price ticks.

You may add stocks of your interest and press Refresh button to get current prices.

Stock charts are available on hyperlinks. Charts are available through (15 minutes delayed) Yahoo servers.

Now, newer interface enables you to watch the scrips as seen on most Trade Terminals. Top of the table now also displays NIFTY and SENSEX, available from NSE and BSE mobile sites, respectively.

Note that : This software is developed for ease of operation and no claim is made for the authenticity of the scrips prices displayed. The network traffic may delay the transmission of data and the prices may not reflect real-time values. All data are available through NSE official web site. The software simply puts different scrips together and fetches live prices through this site. Use and Enjoy…. Installation guideline

Download the NSE_Ticker.CAB file

Store it anywhere on your device

Click to install

You will find NSE Ticker in the Program Start Menu group

General Help To add new scrips, select “ADD SCRIPS” from Menu (Left soft Key). To add scrips which are not available on standard list but are listed on NSE, you may edit the file from your device named “NSETicker_Scrips.txt. This file is stored in device internal memory, even if the software is installed on external memory. Add exact scrip name as listed on NSE and save the file. Be sure not to save in WORD format, the format should be simple text.”

To remove existing scrip from ticker list, select “REMOVE SCRIPS” from Menu. A message will appear to confirm removal from list. Press YES to remove it from ticker list. Remove however, maintains the list of standard (F&O;) scrips. Scrips removed may be added anytime from this list

To save the existing scrip list, select “SAVE LIST TO FILE” from Menu. File will be saved in the device’s internal memory at root folder, named NSETicker_Scrips.txt. You may edit this file manually to change scrips list, group the list or sort the list.

To reload the existing scrip list, select “READ LIST FROM FILE” from Menu.

The hyperlinks available on Scrip Name (first column) enables to view daily chart (as available free from Yahoo server). If you are unable to view the chart to good extent, use “WIDE PAGE” to look at it properly.

 

Download
the NSE Ticker for Pocket PC free

• Price: Freeware

Urban Dictionary for ABBYY Lingvo v.1.1 (06.2011/ENG) | 776MB


The most comprehensive and lively Dictionary of American Slang, and slang. Created and updated online community. Updated on June 10, 2011.


The basis of characteristics:

The dictionary contains all the articles as of fall 2009.
About 20 000 articles in the original have several pages of definitions. For such articles keep only the first page (the 7 most popular definitions), and at the end shows a direct link to the online version.
Information on rating definitions (thumbs up / down) saved.
Many cards have a few titles that differ only in case - this was done in order to maintain the integrity of references to them from other cards.
Images and sounds from the original are missing. By themselves only definitions and examples, plus internal references and labels.

Additional Information:
Because of ABBYY Lingvo 14.0.0.786 younger version does not support such large dictionaries, the dictionary is divided into 2 parts.

Installation

1. For Lingvo 12, X3, X5
In Lingvo select "Tools" -> "Add a dictionary from a file" and specify the sequence files "Urban Dictionary (En-En) part 1.lsd" and "Urban Dictionary (En-En) part 2.lsd". And then indexed. If you need to search for articles.
2. For other versions of Lingvo
Paspakovat archive content from the folder "Urban Dictionary (En-En). Dsl" in a folder with files *. ann, and *. bmp from the archive. Run "ABBYY DSL Compiler", which is part of Lingvo, a sequence of files "Urban Dictionary (En-En) part 1.dsl" and "Urban Dictionary (En-En) part 2.dsl" in the selected directory and set the compile options:
- The encoding of the source text: Unicode
- Automatically add markup to your search: yes
- Then see for Lingvo 12, X3, X5 ".

Version: v.1.1
Version of Lingvo: 12, X3, X5 ( dsl).
Developer: Urbandictionary
Number of titles / Cards: 1 017 849 / 899 834
Compatible with Windows 7/Vista: full
Language: English, Russian
Tablet: Not required
Size: 776.05 MBhttp://www.fileserve.com/file/7cwhHxQ/Urban_download.part1.rar
http://www.fileserve.com/file/sm6ZAea/Urban_download.part2.rar
http://www.fileserve.com/file/qKwuXmb/Urban_download.part3.rar
http://www.fileserve.com/file/jXuWbax/Urban_download.part4.rar

Windows Mobile 6.5 Review: There’s No Excuse For This

I really didn’t want to beat up on WinMo here, because at this point it just feels tired. But man, come on Microsoft, you’re giving me no choice. Windows Mobile 6.5 isn’t just a letdown—it barely seems done.

We’ve been watching Windows Mobile 6.5—or Windows Phone, as Microsoft is sometimes calling it—for months, since Jesus first laid his thumbs on it back in February. We even taught you how to install developer builds! The final version I got for testing, though, was almost identical to the builds we saw so many months ago. This means two things: That we already know what it’s going to look like and how it’s going to work; and that no, it’s nowhere near the upgrade that Windows Mobile needs to be even remotely interesting.

It’s a superficial update, and not a very thorough one. It’s an interim product, and a vain attempt to hold onto the thinning ranks people who still choose Windows Mobile despite not being somehow tethered to it until the tardy Windows Mobile 7 comes out, whenever that may be. And it won’t work.

The Interface

The first thing you’ll notice about Windows Mobile 6.5 is Titanium, the new, menu-style homescreen. It’s large and typographical, and looks almost Zune-like. This is an auspicious start.
Each menu item provides a shortcut to an app, function or widget, and most have some kind of preview capability: you can flip through photo thumbnails, see missed calls, and thumb through emails, calendar appointments and Internet Explorer favorites without leaving the homescreen. Scrolling is smooth, and has an inertia that 6.1 so conspicuously lacked. Likewise, the new lock screen brings some information to the surface, but not much. (It’ll let you know that you have a text, but not what the text says.) Too bad you probably won’t see Titanium, ever, since handset manufacturers will almost certainly cover it up with their own custom homescreen.

The second most obvious change is the Start Menu, which Microsoft is so proud of that they’ve required all 6.5 phone to include a dedicated button for it on all “Windows Phones” a la the Windows Key on a PC. Again, it’s striking, and again, it’s smooth. This one, though, feels more like a design concept than a final product. For example! The only tool you’re given to sort apps is a “Move to Top” command—no dragging, no alphabetical sorting, nothing except this bizarrely-chosen menu command that makes organizing apps feel like completing some kind of horrible puzzle game.
On top of that, there’s no way to tell how many apps you have, to delete them, or to tell which “Page” of the start menu you’re on. The offset icon spacing is awkward and occasionally ugly, and hey! That Windows button? It doesn’t behave like you’d expect it to, opening the Start Menu but not closing it. This whole piece feels half-assed, to put it kindly.

Another well meaning, if not quite adequate change is to the contextual menus. Though they’re ordered exactly as they were before, they’re now huge and thumb-scrollable.

Things get worse when you move past the surface, revealing an OS that hasn’t been fundamentally changed in years, and which bears a strong resemblance to Windows Mobile 6.1, and a startlingly not-weak resemblance to PocketPC 2002. The new homescreen Start Menu, lock screen and contextual menus are just veneers, and they’re not very thick.

The remaining interface changes are subtle, and intended almost solely to make Windows Mobile 6.5 bearable to use without a stylus. (Though don’t get me wrong—most WinMo 6.5 devices will, damningly, still come with styluses.) It doesn’t really feel like a redesign—it feels like someone went through 6.1 and adjusted a few values. Add a few pixels of menu spacing here, some plasticky highlight graphics there, and BOOM. 6.5. Let’s go to lunch.

 

 

The terrible Windows Media Player app looks the same, the photo albums are helped only by smoother scrolling and support of basic swipe gestures, and the text, email, notes and settings pages are jarringly old-looking, and seriously hostile to pointing devices any larger than a pen. Especially fleshy ones.

Come to think of it, after using 6.5 developer builds for a few months and then switching briefly back to a 6.1, the only thing I really missed was the system-wide inertial scrolling, which replaces 6.1’s chunky faux-physics scrolling engine with something that at least behaves predictably.

Windows Marketplace for Mobile

Windows Mobile finally, finally has an app store—quick, look around, is there anyone left who doesn’t? The interface is bit awkward, falling somewhere between the large-typeface aesthetic of Titanium and the barebones HERE’S A LIST sensibility of the rest of the OS, resulting in odd text overflow in menus (sort of like on the Zune HD, except less pretty.) You can find apps though a sensible system of categories, or by searching, and downloading and installing is as easy as pressing a button, though you’ll occasionally be met with prompts from the app installer.

I can’t really pass judgment on the Marketplace’s offerings just yet—it’s only been open for a few hours, and apps seem to be flooding in at a fairly steady rate—but the initial offerings are pretty bare, counting among themselves just a few free apps, nearly all from Microsoft, with cameos by some recognizable Windows Mobile app developers who are still obliviously charging upwards of $20 for apps that wouldn’t break $5 in the iPhone App Store.

 

 

Don’t get me wrong, the Marketplace is a good thing, in that it’ll drive prices down and make finding apps much easier, but it remains to be seen if developers will take to it like they did on the iPhone App Store, or just kinda ignore it like they did with the BlackBerry App World. In any case, this isn’t even a 6.5-exclusive service, and just about any app written for 6.5 will work on 6.1 and 6.0, and vise-versa. A victory for Windows Mobile, sure, but not one that 6.5 can claim as its own. A few more notes on the Marketplace:

• Users are entitled to a 24hr refund

• You can browse apps either on the phone or on a website

• Charges go to either your phone bill or CC bill, though nobody’s signed on for carrier billing yet.

• 6.0 and 6.1 gets the Marketplace in December

• Marketplace will only show you apps that run on your specific phone

• Apps can only be installed on internal storage, despite the fact that you can manually install apps on an SD card with no problem.

• App purchases are tied to your Windows Live ID, and which can be used on up to five phones. Seems a little lenient, but hey, thanks!

My Phone

Another touted feature of 6.5 that will also happen to be available for every other Windows Mobile phone, My Phone is a decently capable backup service. We’ve seen most of it before, but today there are a few new features in top of the super-simple backup service that Jason went so far as to call “fancy:”

• Phone wipe will let you remotely purge your phone

• Locate your phone lets you put it on a map, in case you were wondering where it went/where you neighborhood petty thief eats lunch

• You can search text messages

And I kind of love this one:

• You can switch your phone from silent/vibrate to full volume remotely, in case you lost your phone in the couch and just need it to ring

Alas, these cool extras will be part of a premium version of My Phone, price TBD. UPDATE: It’s free until November 30th, after which it’s $4.99 for 7-day access (most of the premium services are for emergencies, so this makes sense). The free user experience will be a lot like the beta, which is to say basic, but useful for backing up contacts, photos, and other basics on a daily, weekly or monthly basis. The web interface is nice, too—more on that here.

The Browser

The confusingly-named Mobile Internet Explorer 6 is to Mobile IE 5 what IE 7 was to IE6 on the desktop. Get that? This is to say it’s a massive upgrade, but like IE7, which added tabs and popup blocking about two years after everyone else had it, Mobile IE6 is at least a generation behind its competitors. For what it’s worth, it adds smooth panning and scrolling, intelligent zooming and full(er) support for CSS and Javascript pages that MIE5 used to choke on spectacularly.

Rendering is good, but not WebKit good, and the browser has a tendency to reflow text in an odd way, formatting columns of text more narrowly than it should. And even though rendering is vastly improved—though inexplicably, not to the point of theZune HD’s browser—the experience is still glitchy. Page loading is slow even on a fast Wi-Fi connection, and there’s often a pretty wide gap between when a page looks like it’s done and when the browser actually becomes responsive enough to interact with. In short, you’re going to want to install Opera or Skyfire, the former for faster rendering and easier navigation, and the latter for better Flash support (IE6 includes Flash Lite, which is better than nothing, but can’t stack up to Skyfire’s compressed full-Flash trickery.) And hell, one of the two will probably come with your phone anyway, because whoever sells it to you probably wants you to like it.

Of course, you won’t be able to completely abandon IE, since Microsoft is planning on using it for a new Windows Mobile widget platform. This sounds like a bigger deal that it is—these are just web apps, not desktop widgets or anything like that, but they’ll rendered using IE6’s engine, and be available in the Marketplace, mixed in with the other apps.

Performance

Microsoft isn’t really advertising the SUPER SPEED of Windows Mobile 6.5, which makes sense: 6.5 is based on the same underlying Windows CE version (5.2) as 6.1, and even 6.0. In other words, its guts are oooold. In practice, this means that cold app launches are quick enough, but not noticeably faster than 6.1, even on slightly more powerful hardware. (A Touch Diamond2 for 6.5, and a Touch Pro for 6.1)

For Windows mobile, the perception of slowness has always been more of a problem than actualslowness, since flashy animations are sparse, and the manner in which apps load, close and minimize can look a bit clunky. The smooth scrolling and easier navigation at least give the impression the 6.5 is a little leaner and less laggy, but there’s not much new going on under the hood to back that feeling up.

That said, I don’t see why not, since ROM cookers the world over have been squeezing impressive speed out of Windows Mobile for years now, and have even done some admirable work on 6.5 pre-release.

The Crux of the Problem

Last month I reviewed the HTC Touch Pro2. It was too expensive to recommend, but its software was a pleasant surprise. Contextual menus had been skinned with larger, finger-friendly buttons; there was a panel-based app launcher; the supplied browser was pretty good; certain version had a replacement for the start menu; and hey, there was even inertial scrolling across all apps. The catch, though, was that this was a Windows Mobile 6.1 handset. HTC had replicated almost every feature of 6.5 with their own software tweaks, and provided a much better homescreen than Titanium with TouchFLO 3D. All before 6.5 even came out. Install My Phone and Marketplace for Mobile on there, and you’d be hard-pressed to find a single reason to upgrade to 6.5.

To put it another way, handset manufacturers have done more in the last two years to improve Windows Mobile than Microsoft has, which borders on pathetic. In the time since Windows Mobile 6.0 came out in February of 2007, Apple has released the iPhone—three times. Palm has created the Pre, with its totally new webOS. Android has come into being, and grown into something wonderful. RIM has created a touch phoneand a revamped BlackBerry OS. For these companies, the world has changed.

And Microsoft? They eked out some performance enhancements and a new homescreen in 6.1, and executed a gaudy facelift for 6.5. This is what they’ve done to Windows Mobile. What’s amazing is that in the time it took Windows Mobile 6.1 to lazily morph into 6.5, Microsoft—Microsoft!— designed one of the most spectacular handsets I’ve seen in years, loaded it with brilliant, inspired software, a decent web browser and a fledgling app store. One problem! It’s wasn’t a handset. It was a Zune. I understand the the two platforms aren’t directly comparable, and as is, Zune OS wouldn’t work very well for a smartphone, but it’s a taste of something great. And why on earth does the HD have a better browser than Microsoft’s smartphone OS? It’s almost like the Zune team was trying to embarrass the mobile guys or something. And to their credit, if they’re looking for it, they did.

Just Not Enough

Judging from the first wave of 6.5 handsets, the change OS will barely be noticeable to most folks. Alternative interfaces like TouchFLO and TouchWiz will remain, and won’t outwardly change, nor will included apps—they’re all compatible. Customers will buy Windows Mobile phones based on the quality of their 3rd party interfaces; carriers will continue to carry them because certain people, chained by their employers or a specific piece of software, will need them; and app makers will be slow to take to the Marketplace, since hey, how much longer do these Windows CE 5-based OSes even have left? It’ll be a sad, long slog until April (or god forbid,December) when Windows Mobile 7, whatever it is, finally hits phones.

I’d like to think that 6.5’s stunning failure to innovate is a symptom of a neglected project—maybe Microsoft just needed something, anything to hold people over until the mythical Windows Mobile 7 comes out, whatever it is. But as Steve Ballmer himself has plainly admitted, it’s worse: Microsoft has simply lumbered in the wrong direction for two years, letting everyone, save maybe Nokia, fly right past them. [Microsoft]

 

The new start menu, homescreen and lock screen at least look like they’re from 2009 

The default browser is acceptable, whereas it used to be horrible

 

MyPhone and Marketplace are welcome additions and both show plenty of potential, but both will be available on pre-6.5 phones 

 

The core of the OS is almost exactly the same as 6.1, and 6.0 for that matter 

It never takes more than a few finger taps to get from the pretty, new 6.5 interface, to the blocky, old, finger-hostile one

Seriously, it reminds me of Windows for Workgroups

After carriers and handsets manufacturers have their way with it, it will be literally indistinguishable from 6.1.


Windows 8

Windows 8 is the next version of Microsoft Windows, a series of operating systemsproduced by Microsoft for use on personal computers, including home and businessdesktops, laptops, netbooks, tablet PCs, servers and media center PCs. In June 2011 at the Consumer Electronics Show Microsoft announced that it would be including support for system-on-a-chip (SoC) and mobile ARM processors in Windows 8.[2][3] A 32-bit Milestone 1 build, build 7850, with a build date of September 22, 2010, was leaked to BetaArchive, an online beta community, which was soon leaked to P2P/torrent sharing networks on April 12, 2011.[4] Milestone 1 includes a ribboninterface for Windows Explorer,[5] a PDF reader called Modern Reader, an updatedtask manager called Modern Task Manager,[6] and native ISO image mounting.[7] A 32-bit Milestone 2 build, build 7927, was leaked to The Pirate Bay on August 29, 2011 [8] right after many pictures leaked on BetaArchive the day before.[9] Features of this build are mostly the same as build 7955.[10] A 32-bit Milestone 2 build, build 7955, was leaked to BetaArchive on April 25, 2011.[11] Features of this build were a new pattern login and more.[12] A 64-bit Milestone 3 build, build 7959, was leaked to BetaArchive on May 1, 2011.[13] This build is notable for being the first publicly leaked Windows Server 8 build, as well as the first leaked 64-bit build.[14] A Milestone 3 build, build 7971, was released to close partners of Microsoft on March 29, 2011[15] but was kept under heavy security. However, a few screenshots were leaked. The “Windows 7 Basic” theme now uses similar metrics to the Aero style, but maintains its non-hardware accelerated design, and also supports taskbar thumbnails. The boxes that encase the “close, maximize, and minimize” buttons have been removed, leaving just the signs.[16] A 64-bit Milestone 3 build, build 7989, leaked to BetaArchive on June 18, 2011 after screenshots were revealed the previous day. An SMS feature, a new virtual keyboard, a new bootscreen, transparency in the basic theme, geo-location services, Hyper-V 3.0, and Powershell 3.0 were revealed in this build.[17] Other new features found in leaked builds include a new Welcome screen,[18] a new packaged application model called AppX that is based on Silverlight,[19] and a setting to automatically adjust window color to fit the wallpaper.[20] There is also a stripped down “Immersive” version of Internet Explorer, similar to the mobile version of Internet Explorer, but using the desktop Trident rendering engine[21] and a new “Hybrid Boot” option that uses “advanced hibernation functionality” on shutdown to allow faster startup times.[22] Another is the ability to create aPortable Workspace, an installation of Windows 8 on a USB storage device.[23] At the Microsoft Developer Forum in Tokyo on May 23, 2011, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer announced that the next version of Windows will be released the following year (in 2012).[24]

“And yet, as we look forward to the next generation of Windows systems, which will come out next year, there’s a whole lot more coming. As we progress through the year, you ought to expect to hear a lot about Windows 8. Windows 8 slates, tablets, PCs, a variety of different form factors.”[24]

However, the company quickly corrected Ballmer’s words in a company statement issued that afternoon.

“It appears there was a misstatement. We are eagerly awaiting the next generation of Windows 7 hardware that will be available in the coming fiscal year. To date, we have yet to formally announce any timing or naming for the next version of Windows.”[25]

On June 1, 2011, Microsoft officially unveiled Windows 8 and some of its new features at the Taipei Computex 2011 in Taipei (Taiwan) and at the D9 conference in California (United States).[26][27] The main feature that was shown was the new user interface. On August 15, 2011, Microsoft opened a new blog called ‘Building Windows 8’ for users and developers.[28] Microsoft will cover more of the new features and improvements in Windows 8 at the BUILD developer conference, scheduled for September 13-16, 2011.[29]

[edit]Features

The main feature that was shown is the extensively redesigned user interface, optimized for touch as well as use with mice and keyboards. A new “Start screen”, similar to the one in Windows Phone 7, includes live application tiles. It replaces the Start menu, being triggered by the Start button or Windows key, and is also the first screen shown on startup. The user can go to the regular desktop by choosing the “Desktop” tile or a traditional desktop-based application. Windows 8 has a new developer platform according to Microsoft Vice President Julie Larson-Green, who called it “our new developer platform, which is…based on HTML5 and JavaScript.”[30] The new applications run in full-screen, but two of them can be displayed side-by-side using “Snap”. Examples of new applications that were demoed include a Twitter client, a weather application, a stock-tracking application, an RSS news feeder, and a virtual piano. The new interface is primarily designed for 16:9 screen resolutions, with 1366×768 and larger screens able to display two Windows 8 applications. 1024×768 screens can display one Windows 8 application in full-screen, and 1024×600 screens can only use the traditional Windows desktop.[31] Mike Angiulo confirmed at Computex 2011 that Windows 8 will use OEM Activation 3.0 instead of Windows 7 OEM Activation 2.1, which supposedly makes it less prone to cracks. Microsoft is a U.S. computer software and hardware corporationheadquartered in Redmond, Washington. The company’s best-known products include the Windows operating system and Office productivity suite.

Previewing ‘Windows 8’

Article by Julie Larson-Green, corporate vice president, Windows Experience.

inShare
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REDMOND, Wash. – June 1, 2011 – Today, at the D9 Conference, we demonstrated the next generation of Windows, internally code-named “Windows 8,” for the first time. Windows 8 is a reimagining of Windows, from the chip to the interface. A Windows 8-based PC is really a new kind of device, one that scales from touch-only small screens through to large screens, with or without a keyboard and mouse.

The demo showed some of the ways we’ve reimagined the interface for a new generation of touch-centric hardware. Fast, fluid and dynamic, the experience has been transformed while keeping the power, flexibility and connectivity of Windows intact.

Here are a few aspects of the new interface we showed today:

•
Fast launching of apps from a tile-based Start screen, which replaces the Windows Start menu with a customizable, scalable full-screen view of apps.
•
Live tiles with notifications, showing always up-to-date information from your apps.
•
Fluid, natural switching between running apps.
•
Convenient ability to snap and resize an app to the side of the screen, so you can really multitask using the capabilities of Windows.
•
Web-connected and Web-powered apps built using HTML5 and JavaScript that have access to the full power of the PC.
•
Fully touch-optimized browsing, with all the power of hardware-accelerated Internet Explorer 10.
We also showed effortless movement between existing Windows programs and new Windows 8 apps. The full capabilities of Windows continue to be available to you, including the Windows Explorer and Desktop, as does compatibility with all Windows 7 logo PCs, software and peripherals.

Julie Larson-Green, Corporate Vice President, Windows Experience
Click for high-res version.
Although the new user interface is designed and optimized for touch, it works equally well with a mouse and keyboard. Our approach means no compromises — you get to use whatever kind of device you prefer, with peripherals you choose, to run the apps you love. This is sure to inspire a new generation of hardware and software development, improving the experience for PC users around the world.

Today, we also talked a bit about how developers will build apps for the new system. Windows 8 apps use the power of HTML5, tapping into the native capabilities of Windows using standard JavaScript and HTML to deliver new kinds of experiences. These new Windows 8 apps are full-screen and touch-optimized, and they easily integrate with the capabilities of the new Windows user interface. There’s much more to the platform, capabilities and tools than we showed today.

We are excited to bring an innovative new platform and tools to developers and see how their creativity jumpstarts a new generation of apps. Windows 8 apps can use a broad set of new libraries and controls, designed for fluid interaction and seamless connectivity. Apps can add new capabilities to Windows and to other apps, connecting with one another through the new interface. For example, we showed today how a developer can extend the file picker control to enable picking from their own app content or from within another Windows 8 app, in addition to the local file system and the network. We’re just getting started.

And this isn’t just about touch PCs. The new Windows experience will ultimately be powered by application and device developers around the world — one experience across a tremendous variety of PCs. The user interface and new apps will work with or without a keyboard and mouse on a broad range of screen sizes and pixel densities, from small slates to laptops, desktops, all-in-ones, and even classroom-sized displays. Hundreds of millions of PCs will run the new Windows 8 user interface. This breadth of hardware choice is unique to Windows and central to how we see Windows evolving.

The video below introduces a few of the basic elements of the new user interface. Although we have much more to reveal at our developer event, BUILD (Sept. 13 - 16 in Anaheim, Calif.), we’re excited to share our progress with you.

Building "Windows 8" - Video #1
View in stand-alone player (.mp4)
View on YouTube
Today’s demonstration followed our announcements earlier this year about Windows 8 running on System on a Chip (SoC) processors, and our browser engine innovations and significantly increased standards support in Internet Explorer 10. Windows 8 extends these innovations and reimagines every level of the Windows architecture — the kernel, networking, storage, devices, user interface — all building on the broadest and richest ecosystem of software, peripherals and devices.

We have so much more on the way! We’re working very hard to get the product ready for early testing, and we plan to kick off our engineering dialogue through our team blog, just as we did for Windows 7.

So please stay tuned — we have a lot of cool innovation coming in the months ahead.

By Julie Larson-Green
Corporate Vice President, Windows Experience

Minimum System Requirements for Windows 8

As soon as you heard about the coming release of Windows 8, you are probably wondering what kind of hardware updates, or replacement of your current home desktop or laptop you are going to have to make. It has already been demonstrated in a presentation by Microsoft, that the OS will work on many devices and Windows 8configurations. Actually, Windows 8 will be the first multi-device OS system to be released. It is expected that there will be a Windows 8 driver available for just about every component that exists. That being said, let’s have a look at the general situation so you can assess the situation for yourself.

  • Multi-device? What this means is the operating system is designed so that it can work on desktops, laptops, tablets and even mobile phones. The mobile phones will probably come from the big manufacturers such as Nokia. The Windows Phone was not successful, mainly because it required the specific production of hardware for it to operate. Windows 8 will operate on devices like our desktop and laptop that have the operating system stored on the hard drive, or devices that do not have a hard drive, known as SoC (system on chip), such as your tablet and smartphone.
  • Updgrade? Every time there is any development in any OS, and Windows 8 will be no different. You can expect that a better machine will do a better job. That is just the way it is. It is a combination of the strategy manufacturers use so that your current machine will go out of date, and you will need to buy another one, and the fact that there are developments and improvements all the time. So, the issue of upgrade will depend on what you currently own. If it is more than a year old, chances are you will need to get a better machine. Read on.
  • Expected Requirements. A reasonable and probably very accurate guess can be made. You will probably need 2g of RAM (already very common in many machines) and a processor with a minimum of 1.5ghz. These are still very low configurations as many machines already on the market for some time have 4g of RAM and over 2.5ghz. To really enjoy Windows 8, something more like the latter configuration is probably the best. The first example, is really the very bottom limit of what you need.
  • Touch Screen. Windows 8 has been designed with a touch-screen mentality in mind. Something like what we see with the iPad. This is the new way that all computer operating systems are going. Don’t panic, it will still work very well with your keyboard and mouse, and you will be able to switch to the standard desk-top type view if you want.

Microsoft is really lifting their game with this new operating system. Demonstrations show it to be smooth, fast and very sleek.

Is Microsoft putting too much emphasis on touch in Windows 8?

By Adrian Kingsley-Hughes | September 1, 2011, 10:04am PDT Summary: Can an operating system be optimized for both touch and standard input methods? Microsoft believes so.

As more information comes out from Redmond about Windows 8, it’s clear that Microsoft has its sights set on the operating system being tablet ready. But is Microsoft putting too much emphasis on tablets at the expense of traditional Windows-powered systems. In a blog post on Building Windows 8, Microsoft’s President of the Windows Division Steven Sinofsky shows off the new Windows 8 start screen and how the upcoming OS will be both “a reimagined” and a “no compromises” release.

Some of you are probably wondering how these parts work together to create a harmonious experience. Are there two user interfaces? Why not move on to a Metro style experience everywhere? On the other hand, others have been suggesting that Metro is only for tablets and touch, and we should avoid “dumbing down” Windows 8 with that design.

So, how’s it going to work? According to Sinofsky, Windows 8 will be a ”balancing act” that will see “both of user interfaces together harmoniously” within Windows 8.

We knew as we designed the Windows 8 UI that you can’t just flip a bit overnight and turn all of that history into something new. In fact, that is exactly what some people are afraid of us doing. Some have said that is the only path to take. Yet, even those who have fully embraced tablets also own a laptop for those times when they need more precise control or need to use one of the apps that are mission critical (and are still being developed). In people’s desire not to carry around two different devices, “remote desktop” programs for tablets and phones have become popular but extremely awkward attempts to harness the usefulness of the Windows 7 desktop within a new form factor.

Sinofsky dismisses the idea of completely redesigning the Windows UI from the ground up and converting everything to the Metro UI because Microsoft as now come up with a “design that truly affords you the best of the two worlds we see today.”

[I]f you want to stay permanently immersed in that Metro world, you will never see the desktop-we won’t even load it (literally the code will not be loaded) unless you explicitly choose to go there! This is Windows reimagined.

I’ve got to admit that I’m worried. With the traditional UI now being optional, Microsoft is putting an awful lot of time and effort into making its Windows 8 tablet ready. But how big will the market be for “touch-enabled” Windows 8 devices such as tablets and high-end notebooks featuring touch screens? Right now the only company that can seem to turn out tablets in any volume is Apple, and Apple isn’t shoehorning a desktop operating system onto its iPad. While Sinofsky is clever enough not to say it in the blog post, the feeling I get is that Microsoft now sees the traditional desktop UI as “legacy,” and that’s worrying. It’s worrying because it’s now clear that Microsoft can’t Metro-fy things like Windows Explorer and is instead relying on the using a ribbon UI. Problem with the ribbon is that it’s hardly touch-friendly. Does this look “touchy” to you?

WINDOWS 8: NATIVE ISO AND VHD MOUNTING + VIDEO

Posted by matthewkol in Featured ArticlesMicrosoft NewsWindows 8 Videos on August 30th, 2011 | 1 Comment

In a new “Building Windows 8″ blog entry, Microsoft elaborates on how Windows 8 will react to storage files like ISO and VHD. An ISO file is usually found on a CDROM – but those are rare these days and ISO files are mostly found online. So in Windows 8, ISO files will be automatically “mounted,” creating a virtual CDROM that will function just like a normal one. VHD files are given very similar treatment. A VHD file is basically an “image” of the hard disk for use as a virtual disk all the same ways physical ones are. It is used commonly for Hyper-V to store information for Virtual Machines. To access a VHD file in Windows 8, click, find the new icon, use just as any other storage device, and eject. Watch the video below for a walkthrough, and watch closely at 0:23-0:33 and at 2:23-2:38: is Microsoft teasing us again with a new taskbar and start screen?

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WEEKLY ROUNDUP: WINDOWS 8 NEWS

Posted by matthewkol in Uncategorized on August 29th, 2011 | No Comments

So as you probably know, there has been a slew of leaks and information about Windows 8 these past few days – and in case you missed any of it (or is the type of person who only reads the first post on a website), here’s the link to four brand new articles Windows8Center has written for your enjoyment. 1.) New Designs for Windows 8 Apps Begin to Emerge 2.) Mystery Quad Core Tablet Running Windows 8 3.) Milestone 2 Windows 8 Build 7972 Leaks

4.) New Windows Explorer Interface in “Building Windows 8″ Blog

What do you think about all the news? Sound off in the comments!

UPDATE: New Windows 8 Ad

UPDATE 2: New “Building Windows 8″ Video: Native ISO and VHD Mounting (There sure is a lot of news these past few days!)

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MICROSOFT SHOWS OFF WINDOWS 8 UI/TABLET IN COMMERCIAL? UPDATE

Posted by matthewkol in UncategorizedWindows 8 ImagesWindows 8 NewsWindows 8 RumorsWindows 8 Videos on August 29th, 2011 | No Comments

A new ad has appeared on Vimeo for Microsoft’s Windows Enterprise group. What’s particularly interesting about this (that Winrumors first spot) is a new taskbar UI for Windows that Microsoft seems to display twice in the video. It is to be noted that in the video normal versions of Vista and Windows 7 are shown, giving me the impression that many Microsoft OS’s are being displayed here, so the one with the new taskbar could very well be Windows 8. The design is in accordance with the Metro UI design paradigms: a flattened Windows Start icon with a clock in the middle. It also seems to be translucent. Keep reading for what Windows8Center saw in the video! UPDATE: Winrumors has updated its post stating that the taskbar is just a theme from a popular theming tool called Rainmeter; however, the next part of the article still stands. A glimpse into Windows 8? What Windows8Center discovered was a tablet with a Fujitsu logo. It seems very similar to the picture of the “mystery quad-core tablet,” which you can read about here. The woman in the ad appears to be using it for work and is seen typing on some sort of virtual keyboard. Since two Microsoft operating systems can be found in this video (Vista and Windows 7), it’s not a stretch that Microsoft would include Windows 8. Not to mention the fact that Fujitsu was actually the company that announced the world’s first Mango smartphone earlier this week. What do you think of the relationship between Microsoft and Fujitsu? Sound off in the comments!

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NEW “BUILDING WINDOWS 8″ POST: EXPLORER IMPROVEMENTS

Posted by matthewkol in Featured ArticlesWindows 8 NewsWindows 8 Videos on August 29th, 2011 | 1 Comment

Earlier today, Microsoft posted another entry in its new “Building Windows 8″ blog. It begins by elucidating on the history and evolution of the popular tool Windows Explorer, from Windows 1.0 to Windows XP to finally Windows 7. Then some interesting data is shown: how often different commands are used in Explorer (the top 10 commands people use are 81.8% of Explorer command use and the top 7 are all for manipulating/managing files), how people access these commands most frequently (86.7% of commands are accessed by either way of the right-click menu or hotkeys, and only 10.9% come from the command bar, the most visible UI element in Explorer in Windows 7 and Vista.), and finally, which of the top 10 commands are found in the command bar (only Refresh and the command bar itself.) A clear user interface design principle is that frequently used commands should be easy to get to. The Windows 8 team, realizing that the last few iterations of Microsoft’s flagship operating system have not adhered to this axiom, set out to revamp Explorer.                                                                                   Top 10 commands in Windows Explorer                                                                              How commands are accessed These thoughts have materialized in a new ribbon interface which exposes a lot of the “hidden gems” in Explorer that most consumers don’t even know exist and gives quick and easy access to the most popular commands in a touch-friendly way. As an added bonus, the ribbon interface is already familiar to most users that have Office 2007 or 2010.  The new UI, despite the ribbon subtracting screen real estate from the top of the window (excessive toolbars in Internet Explorer, anyone?), actually ends up being more spacious than its predecessor because of a few smart rearrangements. New ribbon interface with overlay showing Command usage pecent Real estate comparison between Windows 7 Explorer and Windows 8 Explorer You can also watch the new video here:

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MILESTONE 2 WINDOWS 8 BUILD 7927

Posted by matthewkol in Featured ArticlesWindows 8 ImagesWindows 8 Leaks on August 29th, 2011 | No Comments

Earlier today, a Milestone 2 version of Windows 8 leaked and is circulating on torrent sites. The build is an early sample if Microsoft’s work with the Milestone 2 stage of Windows 8. It was compiled in February, so it’s pretty old and does not contain any new improvements or features. Microsoft is well into the 80.xx build numbers and revealed today that it is at the 8059 stage of Windows 8, which was unveiled during a video demonstration (“Building Windows 8”) of the new ribbon user interface in Windows 8′s Explorer.

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MYSTERY QUAD-CORE WINDOWS 8 TABLET?

Posted by matthewkol in Windows 8 ImagesWindows 8 NewsWindows 8 Rumors on August 29th, 2011 | 1 Comment

On Wednesday, August 24th, a group of technology enthusiasts convened for Microsoft’s annual Tech Ed conference in Auckland, New Zealand. Microsoft reportedly showcased a plethora of new gadgets in a session entitled “Windows Devices.” One of these devices is an Windows 8 ready unbranded slate which has never been seen before. Two pictures were taken and posted online by self-described Microsoft fanboy and IT consultant Alan Burchill from a session with Microsoft Principal Architect Patrick Hevesi. Burchill mentioned alongside the pictures that the device was a “Quad Core Windows Slate that will be given out at an upcoming Microsoft Event,” but those claims have since been mysteriously pulled from the post with no explanation. Burchill seems to be blatantly referring to the sold-out BUILD conference, which is scheduled to commence in two weeks on September 13. It is notable that Microsoft regularly gives away a related device at BUILD, with Windows 7′s announcement year offering laptops running the new OS.

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NEW WORK ON WINDOWS 8 APPS

Posted by matthewkol in Windows 8 ImagesWindows 8 News on August 29th, 2011 | No Comments

Companies are gearing up for the imminent release of Windows 8, and it seems the operating system has shown enough promise to pique the interest of app developers. ZDNet.com has found that Robbie Dillon, the art director of the newspaper USA Today, updated his portfolio with this image of a proposed Windows 8 USA Today app. It appears to be running on some sort of tablet/slate device.

In preparation for the Windows 8 release, this app is being built to take advantage of the touch-first, native environment of Windows 8, while retaining the look and feel of the Windows Metro UI and showcasing the content of USA Today.”

Their apparent enthusiasm for Windows 8 comes as no surprise; the news provider already has apps for the iPad, Android Honeycomb (built for tablets), Windows 7 on tablets, and even the HP TouchPad. (As well as all their smartphone counterparts.)

Jetstream Software is another company which has also showcased an app built around “social traveling.” They were also eager to expound on their history with Windows:

Jetstream has worked extensively with each new Microsoft Operating system long before it is released. We’ve been building applications on Windows 7 since early betas. By the time most companies begin development on applications for a new operating system, we’ve been using it daily for months. We’ve learned the pitfalls, what works, and most importantly what does not.”

Neowin.net warns that the app is not confirmed to built specifically for Windows 8. And remember, it’s highly likely that at the BUILD Conference, Microsoft will exhibit many more sample apps being built for Windows 8.

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WINDOWS 8 BETA RELEASE IMMINENT?

Posted by matthewkol in Windows 8 News on August 21st, 2011 | 2 Comments

A plethora of rumors have been circulating regarding the release of Windows 8, as well as its RTM, pre-release, and beta counterparts. Windows8Center wrote about the possibility that Windows 8 beta release would take place at Microsoft’s BUILD Conference in September. On August 16th, Microsoft kicked off its new blog called “Building Windows 8” with its first entry, written by Steven Sinofsky, the president of the Windows Division. The blog’s intent is to “make sure that we have a reasonable degree of confidence in what we talk about, before we talk about it. Our top priority is the responsibility we feel to our customers and partners, to make sure we’re not stressing priorities, churning resource allocations, or causing strategic confusion among the tens of thousands of you who care deeply and have much invested in the evolution of Windows.” The entry mainly talks about the blog itself, but it does give little hints about what is to come. “The next major event for Windows is our BUILD conference in September, where we will provide developers with more details about the full spectrum of tools and capabilities available to make the most of Windows 8.” While it’s not exactly transparent about a beta, it’s clear that a lot more information about Windows 8 and its features will be presented in September. Thanks to the new blog, we can look forward to a bit more illumination on Windows 8 that’s reliable and not just a rumor.

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DELL PEJU WINDOWS 8 TABLET

Posted by matthewkol in Windows 8 Rumors on July 25th, 2011 | 1 Comment

For a long time, Dell has been a steadfast and loyal partner to Microsoft. Even outside of desktops and laptops, Dell has equipped its products with the latest from Microsoft. Case in point – The Dell Venue Pro smartphone runs on Windows Phone 7, and the innovative Dell Inspiron Duo runs on Windows 7. Yes, Dell has made feeble attempts at Android mobile devices, but none of those have been quite as lucrative as Dell would have expected. It’s interesting that after Dell released the Android phone and tablets, it released a Windows Phone and a Windows tablet, implying that Dell might be abandoning Android in favor of Microsoft software. This might explain why there have been rumors that Dell would be releasing another tablet in January 2012 (codenamed Peju), but recent news from http://dellpejuinsider.blogspot.com/ suggests otherwise, claiming that the release is slated for October 2011. The most fascinating aspect of this tablet, aside from the hardware specs that would put it on another level from competitors, is the fact that it’s purported to be Windows 8 compatible. The expected specs are below, along with a picture of the Peju itself:

  • CPU: Intel Core i5 processor
  • Memory: 4 GB
  • Storage: 64 GB SSD or 120 GB SSD
  • Display: 10.1-inch, wide-angle, 1920×1080
  • OS: Windows 7 Pro / Windows 8 Compatible
  • Slots/ ports: 2-USB, Mini VGA, HDMI, microSD, audio, SIM (3G)
  • Battery: integrated, 5,500 mAh, 6 – 8 hour real-world battery life
  • Connectivity: WiFi b/g, Bluetooth, 3G & 4G
  • Webcam: 1.3 MP Front Facing & 5MP Rear Facing Camera
  • Input: Touch, Stylus, Bluetooth Keyboard, & USB Keyboard. via the docking station. (Keyboard not included)
  • Dimensions: 10.8 x 6.7 x 0.63 inches, 1.9 lbs.

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« Previous Entries

This takes Windows in a direction that I don’t want to see it take … that is one of oversimplification, or to put that another way, dumbing down. Balancing acts are tricky, and until I see it in action, I’m worried that Microsoft is getting too obsessed with touch. While Metro looks nice (well, it looks nice on smartphones, it’s too early to tell what it will be like on the desktop), smearing lots of lipstick on a pig’s snout doesn’t change the fact that it’s a pig. Unless Metro actually morphs into a complete replacement for the current UI, it’ll be nothing more than a dumbed down shell hiding the “real” Windows underneath.

TOI Tech

Microsoft recently previewed Windows 8 to customers, partners and media at the Computex show in Taipei. Vice President Mike Angiulo ran the system on tablets, notebooks and desktop systems made by Dell Inc, Asustek Computer Inc, and Quanta Computer Inc using chips and technology from ARM Holdings Plc, Qualcomm Inc, Texas Instruments Inc and Nvidia Corp.

Here are — things you need to know about Windows 8 which Microsoft claims 8 is a reimagining of Windows, from the chip to the interface.

8 Things About Windows 8

What does Microsoft have up its sleeve for Windows 8? Details are scant, but for the first time since Microsoftreleased Windows 7 (July 2009) proof Microsoft is busy prepping its next OS is surfacing on the Web. As tablets and “the cloud” continue to de-emphasize the traditional desktop OS, Microsoft really can’t afford to rest on its Windows 7 laurels.

The era of cellphones, tablets, the cloud, and even gaming appear to be figuring strongly into Microsoft’s thinking for Windows 8. From what I can piece together Microsoft appears to be mixing the best of many of its products and services into one streamlined computing experience called Windows 8.

Here are eight things about Windows 8 I culled from the Web that hint to what might see in the final release.

Windows 8 Milestone 2 build 7955 leaked

Windows 8 – Build 7955

A Milestone 2 version of Windows 8 leaked publicly on Monday.

The build is currently being distributed on FTPs and file sharing sites after an anonymous leakster posted the bits to the beta archive site. The build is an early sample of Microsoft’s work with Windows 8 and does not reflect the current state of winmain builds.

The build is currently available on private FTP sites and is expected to be made available on the usual torrentand file sharing sites in the next few hours.

You can unlock the following in 7955:
– Ribbon UI
– Application Folder (now working, in 7850 it was broken)
– Full DWM (hideblur)

The following requires the ”red pill”:
– Webcam
– Login (that ugly guy with ctrl+alt+del, the fishy wallpaper, pattern login)
– TaskUI (new taskmanager)
– PDF Reader
– Immersive Browser

Microsoft is currently working on various Windows 8 features and is expected to deliver an early copy to developers at its Windows Developer Conference (WDC) in September. Here’s a round-up of the latest Windows 8 news:

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Designing for Metro style and the desktop

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31 Aug 2011 8:00 AM

We thought it would be good to take a moment to talk about where we are heading in terms of the user interface of Windows 8.

By now you’ve seen two different elements of the Windows 8 design—first, a Metro style user interface we showed previously and in a video seen by millions of folks. And recently, we have described in this blog some of the enhancements we’re making to familiar Windows desktop tools such as Explorer and the copy file dialog. We’ve seen a lot of dialog about these changes.

Some of you are probably wondering how these parts work together to create a harmonious experience. Are there two user interfaces? Why not move on to a Metro style experience everywhere? On the other hand, others have been suggesting that Metro is only for tablets and touch, and we should avoid “dumbing down” Windows 8 with that design.

This is a balancing act, and one we’ll be talking quite a lot about in this blog in the coming months. Having both of user interfaces together harmoniously is an important part of Windows 8. As a starting point for the discussion, here is how we approached the design of Windows 8 from the very beginning.

We started planning Windows 8 during the summer of 2009 (before Windows 7 shipped). From the start, our approach has been to reimagine Windows, and to be open to revisiting even the most basic elements of the user model, the platform and APIs, and the architectures we support.  Our goal was a no compromise design.

This is an ambitious undertaking—it involves tools, APIs, languages, UI conventions, and even some of the most basic assumptions about a PC. For example, how do you isolate applications from each other, or prevent applications from stealing all your battery power? How can installing (and removing) apps be as quick and painless as changing the channel on the TV? How do you attract the broadest set of developers possible to a new platform? How do you build a touch-first interface with a unique point of view?

When we showed the first demos of Windows 8, we introduced our new Metro experience—fast and fluid, immersive, beautiful, and app-centric. We are certain that as we show you more in the coming months you will see just how deeply we have reimagined Windows.  Metro style is much more than the visual design as we shall see.

Image showing the Metro UI with the word "Start", and several tiles representing different apps in Windows 8.

At the same time, we recognized that Windows 7 has been a huge success. Not just as measured by sales figures or by the number of people using it, but also by the depth of usage. Hundreds of millions of people rely on the Windows 7 UI and existing Windows apps and devices every day, and would value (and expect) us to bring forward aspects of that experience to their next PCs.

In this light, the role of the Windows desktop is clear. It powers the hundreds of thousands of existing apps that people rely on today, a vast array of business software, and provides a level of precision and control that is essential for certain tasks. The things that people do today on PCs don’t suddenly go away just because there are new Metro style apps. The mechanisms that people rely on today (mice, physical keyboards, trackpads) don’t suddenly become less useful or “bad” just because touch is also provided as a first-class option. These tools are quite often the most ergonomic, fast, and powerful ways of getting many things done.

We knew as we designed the Windows 8 UI that you can’t just flip a bit overnight and turn all of that history into something new. In fact, that is exactly what some people are afraid of us doing. Some have said that is the only path to take. Yet, even those who have fully embraced tablets also own a laptop for those times when they need more precise control or need to use one of the apps that are mission critical (and are still being developed). In people’s desire not to carry around two different devices, “remote desktop” programs for tablets and phones have become popular but extremely awkward attempts to harness the usefulness of the Windows 7 desktop within a new form factor.

Why not just start over from scratch? Why not just remove all of the desktop features and only ship the Metro experience? Why not “convert” everything to Metro?  The arguments for a “clean slate” are well known, both for and against. We chose to take the approach of building a design without compromise. A design that truly affords you the best of the two worlds we see today. Our perspective rests on the foundation of the open PC architecture that has proven flexible and adaptable over many significant changes in hardware capabilities and software paradigms.  This is the flexibility that has served as a cornerstone through transitions in user interface, connectivity, programming models, and hardware capabilities (to name a few).

We believe there is room for a more elegant, perhaps a more nuanced, approach. You get a beautiful, fast and fluid, Metro style interface and a huge variety of new apps to use. These applications have new attributes (a platform) that go well beyond the graphical styling (much to come on this at Build).  As we showed, you get an amazing touch experience, and also one that works with mouse, trackpad, and keyboard. And if you want to stay permanently immersed in that Metro world, you will never see the desktop—we won’t even load it (literally the code will not be loaded) unless you explicitly choose to go there!  This is Windows reimagined.

But if you do see value in the desktop experience—in precise control, in powerful windowing and file management, in compatibility with hundreds of thousands of existing programs and devices, in support of your business software, those capabilities are right at your fingertips as well. You don’t need to change to a different device if you want to edit photos or movies professionally, create documents for your job or school, manage a large corpus of media or data, or get done the infinite number of things people do with a PC today. And if you don’t want to do any of those “PC” things, then you don’t have to and you’re not paying for them in memory, battery life, or hardware requirements.  If you do want or need this functionality, then you can switch to it with ease and fluidity because Windows is right there. Essentially, you can think of the Windows desktop as just another app.

Windows 8 brings together all the power and flexibility you have in your PC today with the ability to immerse yourself in a Metro style experience. You don’t have to compromise! You carry one device that does everything you want and need.  You can connect that device to peripherals you want to use. You can use devices designed to dock to large screen displays and other peripherals.  You can use convertible devices that can be both immersive tablets and flexible laptops.

Which brings us back to the improvements we’re making to the desktop experience: we believe in the Windows desktop. It powers the experiences today that make a Windows 7 PC the most popular device in the world. So, even if we believe that over time many scenarios will be well-served by Metro style apps, for the foreseeable future, the desktop is going to continue to play a key role in many people’s lives. So we are going to improve it. We’re having a good dialog about what folks might think about our design choices but also wanted to put these choices in a broader context of the unmatched utility of the desktop.

Our design goal was clear: no compromises. If you want to, you can seamlessly switch between Metro style apps and the improved Windows desktop. Existing apps, devices, and tools all remain and are improved in Windows 8. On the other hand, if you prefer to immerse yourself in only Metro style apps (and platform) and the new user experience, you can do that as well!  Developers can target the APIs that make sense for the software they wish to deliver.  People can debate how much they need or don’t need different aspects of the product, but that has always been the case.  All of this is made possible by the flexibility of Windows.

This is just the beginning of the discussion. There’s so much more to talk about as we dive into details about the Windows 8 UI. We’re delivering a whole new experience, reimagined from the chips all the way to the user experience, to enable new scenarios, new apps, and new ways of using a PC.

–Steven

WINDOWS 8: NATIVE ISO AND VHD MOUNTING + VIDEO
Posted by matthewkol in Featured Articles, Microsoft News, Windows 8 Videos on August 30th, 2011 | 1 Comment
In a new “Building Windows 8″ blog entry, Microsoft elaborates on how Windows 8 will react to storage files like ISO and VHD. An ISO file is usually found on a CDROM – but those are rare these days and ISO files are mostly found online. So in Windows 8, ISO files will be automatically “mounted,” creating a virtual CDROM that will function just like a normal one.







VHD files are given very similar treatment. A VHD file is basically an “image” of the hard disk for use as a virtual disk all the same ways physical ones are. It is used commonly for Hyper-V to store information for Virtual Machines. To access a VHD file in Windows 8, click, find the new icon, use just as any other storage device, and eject.







Watch the video below for a walkthrough, and watch closely at 0:23-0:33 and at 2:23-2:38: is Microsoft teasing us again with a new taskbar and start screen?





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WEEKLY ROUNDUP: WINDOWS 8 NEWS
Posted by matthewkol in Uncategorized on August 29th, 2011 | No Comments
So as you probably know, there has been a slew of leaks and information about Windows 8 these past few days – and in case you missed any of it (or is the type of person who only reads the first post on a website), here’s the link to four brand new articles Windows8Center has written for your enjoyment.

1.) New Designs for Windows 8 Apps Begin to Emerge

2.) Mystery Quad Core Tablet Running Windows 8

3.) Milestone 2 Windows 8 Build 7972 Leaks

4.) New Windows Explorer Interface in “Building Windows 8″ Blog

What do you think about all the news? Sound off in the comments!

UPDATE: New Windows 8 Ad

UPDATE 2: New “Building Windows 8″ Video: Native ISO and VHD Mounting (There sure is a lot of news these past few days!)

 



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MICROSOFT SHOWS OFF WINDOWS 8 UI/TABLET IN COMMERCIAL? UPDATE
Posted by matthewkol in Uncategorized, Windows 8 Images, Windows 8 News, Windows 8 Rumors, Windows 8 Videos on August 29th, 2011 | No Comments
A new ad has appeared on Vimeo for Microsoft’s Windows Enterprise group. What’s particularly interesting about this (that Winrumors first spot) is a new taskbar UI for Windows that Microsoft seems to display twice in the video. It is to be noted that in the video normal versions of Vista and Windows 7 are shown, giving me the impression that many Microsoft OS’s are being displayed here, so the one with the new taskbar could very well be Windows 8. The design is in accordance with the Metro UI design paradigms: a flattened Windows Start icon with a clock in the middle. It also seems to be translucent. Keep reading for what Windows8Center saw in the video! UPDATE: Winrumors has updated its post stating that the taskbar is just a theme from a popular theming tool called Rainmeter; however, the next part of the article still stands.



A glimpse into Windows 8?

What Windows8Center discovered was a tablet with a Fujitsu logo. It seems very similar to the picture of the “mystery quad-core tablet,” which you can read about here. The woman in the ad appears to be using it for work and is seen typing on some sort of virtual keyboard. Since two Microsoft operating systems can be found in this video (Vista and Windows 7), it’s not a stretch that Microsoft would include Windows 8. Not to mention the fact that Fujitsu was actually the company that announced the world’s first Mango smartphone earlier this week. What do you think of the relationship between Microsoft and Fujitsu? Sound off in the comments!





 

 



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NEW “BUILDING WINDOWS 8″ POST: EXPLORER IMPROVEMENTS
Posted by matthewkol in Featured Articles, Windows 8 News, Windows 8 Videos on August 29th, 2011 | 1 Comment
Earlier today, Microsoft posted another entry in its new “Building Windows 8″ blog. It begins by elucidating on the history and evolution of the popular tool Windows Explorer, from Windows 1.0 to Windows XP to finally Windows 7. Then some interesting data is shown: how often different commands are used in Explorer (the top 10 commands people use are 81.8% of Explorer command use and the top 7 are all for manipulating/managing files), how people access these commands most frequently (86.7% of commands are accessed by either way of the right-click menu or hotkeys, and only 10.9% come from the command bar, the most visible UI element in Explorer in Windows 7 and Vista.), and finally, which of the top 10 commands are found in the command bar (only Refresh and the command bar itself.) A clear user interface design principle is that frequently used commands should be easy to get to. The Windows 8 team, realizing that the last few iterations of Microsoft’s flagship operating system have not adhered to this axiom, set out to revamp Explorer.



                                                                                  Top 10 commands in Windows Explorer                                                                         

    How commands are accessed

These thoughts have materialized in a new ribbon interface which exposes a lot of the “hidden gems” in Explorer that most consumers don’t even know exist and gives quick and easy access to the most popular commands in a touch-friendly way. As an added bonus, the ribbon interface is already familiar to most users that have Office 2007 or 2010.  The new UI, despite the ribbon subtracting screen real estate from the top of the window (excessive toolbars in Internet Explorer, anyone?), actually ends up being more spacious than its predecessor because of a few smart rearrangements.



New ribbon interface with overlay showing Command usage pecent

Real estate comparison between Windows 7 Explorer and Windows 8 Explorer

You can also watch the new video here:





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MILESTONE 2 WINDOWS 8 BUILD 7927
Posted by matthewkol in Featured Articles, Windows 8 Images, Windows 8 Leaks on August 29th, 2011 | No Comments
Earlier today, a Milestone 2 version of Windows 8 leaked and is circulating on torrent sites. The build is an early sample if Microsoft’s work with the Milestone 2 stage of Windows 8.



It was compiled in February, so it’s pretty old and does not contain any new improvements or features. Microsoft is well into the 80.xx build numbers and revealed today that it is at the 8059 stage of Windows 8, which was unveiled during a video demonstration (“Building Windows 8”) of the new ribbon user interface in Windows 8′s Explorer.





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MYSTERY QUAD-CORE WINDOWS 8 TABLET?
Posted by matthewkol in Windows 8 Images, Windows 8 News, Windows 8 Rumors on August 29th, 2011 | 1 Comment
On Wednesday, August 24th, a group of technology enthusiasts convened for Microsoft’s annual Tech Ed conference in Auckland, New Zealand. Microsoft reportedly showcased a plethora of new gadgets in a session entitled “Windows Devices.” One of these devices is an Windows 8 ready unbranded slate which has never been seen before. Two pictures were taken and posted online by self-described Microsoft fanboy and IT consultant Alan Burchill from a session with Microsoft Principal Architect Patrick Hevesi.





Burchill mentioned alongside the pictures that the device was a “Quad Core Windows Slate that will be given out at an upcoming Microsoft Event,” but those claims have since been mysteriously pulled from the post with no explanation. Burchill seems to be blatantly referring to the sold-out BUILD conference, which is scheduled to commence in two weeks on September 13. It is notable that Microsoft regularly gives away a related device at BUILD, with Windows 7′s announcement year offering laptops running the new OS.



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NEW WORK ON WINDOWS 8 APPS
Posted by matthewkol in Windows 8 Images, Windows 8 News on August 29th, 2011 | No Comments
Companies are gearing up for the imminent release of Windows 8, and it seems the operating system has shown enough promise to pique the interest of app developers. ZDNet.com has found that Robbie Dillon, the art director of the newspaper USA Today, updated his portfolio with this image of a proposed Windows 8 USA Today app. It appears to be running on some sort of tablet/slate device.



“In preparation for the Windows 8 release, this app is being built to take advantage of the touch-first, native environment of Windows 8, while retaining the look and feel of the Windows Metro UI and showcasing the content of USA Today.”

Their apparent enthusiasm for Windows 8 comes as no surprise; the news provider already has apps for the iPad, Android Honeycomb (built for tablets), Windows 7 on tablets, and even the HP TouchPad. (As well as all their smartphone counterparts.)

Jetstream Software is another company which has also showcased an app built around “social traveling.” They were also eager to expound on their history with Windows:



“Jetstream has worked extensively with each new Microsoft Operating system long before it is released. We’ve been building applications on Windows 7 since early betas. By the time most companies begin development on applications for a new operating system, we’ve been using it daily for months. We’ve learned the pitfalls, what works, and most importantly what does not.”

Neowin.net warns that the app is not confirmed to built specifically for Windows 8. And remember, it’s highly likely that at the BUILD Conference, Microsoft will exhibit many more sample apps being built for Windows 8.



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WINDOWS 8 BETA RELEASE IMMINENT?
Posted by matthewkol in Windows 8 News on August 21st, 2011 | 2 Comments
A plethora of rumors have been circulating regarding the release of Windows 8, as well as its RTM, pre-release, and beta counterparts. Windows8Center wrote about the possibility that Windows 8 beta release would take place at Microsoft’s BUILD Conference in September.

On August 16th, Microsoft kicked off its new blog called “Building Windows 8” with its first entry, written by Steven Sinofsky, the president of the Windows Division. The blog’s intent is to “make sure that we have a reasonable degree of confidence in what we talk about, before we talk about it. Our top priority is the responsibility we feel to our customers and partners, to make sure we’re not stressing priorities, churning resource allocations, or causing strategic confusion among the tens of thousands of you who care deeply and have much invested in the evolution of Windows.”

The entry mainly talks about the blog itself, but it does give little hints about what is to come. “The next major event for Windows is our BUILD conference in September, where we will provide developers with more details about the full spectrum of tools and capabilities available to make the most of Windows 8.” While it’s not exactly transparent about a beta, it’s clear that a lot more information about Windows 8 and its features will be presented in September.

Thanks to the new blog, we can look forward to a bit more illumination on Windows 8 that’s reliable and not just a rumor.



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DELL PEJU WINDOWS 8 TABLET
Posted by matthewkol in Windows 8 Rumors on July 25th, 2011 | 1 Comment
For a long time, Dell has been a steadfast and loyal partner to Microsoft. Even outside of desktops and laptops, Dell has equipped its products with the latest from Microsoft. Case in point – The Dell Venue Pro smartphone runs on Windows Phone 7, and the innovative Dell Inspiron Duo runs on Windows 7. Yes, Dell has made feeble attempts at Android mobile devices, but none of those have been quite as lucrative as Dell would have expected. It’s interesting that after Dell released the Android phone and tablets, it released a Windows Phone and a Windows tablet, implying that Dell might be abandoning Android in favor of Microsoft software.

This might explain why there have been rumors that Dell would be releasing another tablet in January 2012 (codenamed Peju), but recent news from http://dellpejuinsider.blogspot.com/ suggests otherwise, claiming that the release is slated for October 2011. The most fascinating aspect of this tablet, aside from the hardware specs that would put it on another level from competitors, is the fact that it’s purported to be Windows 8 compatible. The expected specs are below, along with a picture of the Peju itself:

CPU: Intel Core i5 processor
Memory: 4 GB
Storage: 64 GB SSD or 120 GB SSD
Display: 10.1-inch, wide-angle, 1920×1080
OS: Windows 7 Pro / Windows 8 Compatible
Slots/ ports: 2-USB, Mini VGA, HDMI, microSD, audio, SIM (3G)
Battery: integrated, 5,500 mAh, 6 – 8 hour real-world battery life
Connectivity: WiFi b/g, Bluetooth, 3G & 4G
Webcam: 1.3 MP Front Facing & 5MP Rear Facing Camera
Input: Touch, Stylus, Bluetooth Keyboard, & USB Keyboard. via the docking station. (Keyboard not included)
Dimensions: 10.8 x 6.7 x 0.63 inches, 1.9 lbs.


IncrediMail

IncrediMail
Select Version for Download
Official Website – http://www.incredimail.comCompany – IncrediMail Ltd.Current Version – Build 2180
Software
Version
Compatibility Free of adware,
spyware, viruses?
IncrediMail Build 2031 (7.8 MB) no
IncrediMail Build 2077 (7.8 MB) no
IncrediMail Build 2089 (7.8 MB) no
IncrediMail Build 2131 (7.8 MB) no
IncrediMail Build 2154 (7.9 MB) no
IncrediMail Build 2180 (8.0 MB) no

Do you have a software version thats not currently listed?

Upload it now and get rewarded!

IncrediMail

IncrediMail is an e-mail client which produces multimedia e-mail.

Its free ad-supported version is available for download at its website. The paid version, IncrediMail Premium, removes its advertisements.

The product is intended to be user-friendly, and it employs a Graphical User Interface and multiple templates. The program offers both audio and video embedding in e-mail messages.

IncrediMail-authored e-mails do not require the program to exist on recipient machines, but the e-mail servers do need to enable the IncrediMail formats.

Some people think the program would increases message sizes (and consequently download times for recipients) and uses more bandwidth than text-only or HTML mail. But if you are willing to have a look at the preferences you can switch it to sending plain text messages, which are by very nature the same size with every program.

Description courtesy of Wikipedia.


Acer bluetooth problem

problem and solution
mukund: I have an Acer Aspire 5100 that came with XP MCE. After upgrading to windows vista ultimate, I found out i didn’t like it too much. So I did a clean install to Windows XP SP2. Now I have to get all of the drivers back. Before my clean install I could push the switch on my laptop and it would show an OSD stating I had no bluetooth devices around. After the clean install, I went to the Panam Acer’s website and downloaded all seventy-some megabytes of bluetooth driver to my computer. During the installation it told me that I did not have any bluetooth devices. After playing with the BT switch on the front of my laptop for awhile, I just clicked cancel on that dialog. After the restart I still do not have any BT hardwire identified. Not only that but it dosen’t look like how it came orignally. Now it has the tray icon, the desktop icon, etc. And now I look just like the icon on this reply. Any ideas?
(resolved)Acer bluetooth problem

hello, I have an acer model aspire 1640.
it appears that my bluetooth kept on saying “no device found.” whenever I right click the icon by the taskbar, even if my bluetooth is on, and I can’t use it.. what is the problem? may someone please help me. thank you..
I’ve just bought an aspire 6570, wiped off XP home (after burning the backup DVD), everything’s OK, I’ve downloaded all of the drivers from the Acer website, I had problems finding the Bluetooth drivers though.Finally found them on the backup DVD, installed them OK, but I can’t turn on the bluetooth from the switch on the front of the lappy.The wireless lan turns on and off ok – I get the “wireless Lan Enabled” and “Wireless Lan Disabled” messages fine. but when I try and turn on the bluetooth device, it says “No Device”

There’s nothing in the bios relating to Bluetooth – but I don’t understand why it’s not working – has anyone else had this problem (wish I’d tested it on XP home before re-installing Pro).
I’m thinking it may be a hardware problem – but would appreciate any thoughts on other avenues before contacting Acer..

This is what Acer says about the 1640 and bluetooth.Although there is a button on the
notebook for Bluetooth, the Aspire 1640 models that ship in the US and
Canada do not ship with a Bluetooth module on the motherboard. Therefore it
does not support Bluetooth as it ships. If you push the BT button you
should see No Device on the screen. In order to get Bluetooth, you will
need to purchase a third party device such as a USB to Bluetooth
transceiver, or other external device that provides Bluetooth capabilities.
These type of devices are available at most computer shops that sell
options and accessories for notebook products. We do not plan to implement
an option to install a Bluetooth module on the motherboard.index of acer drivers

index of /netbook/aspire_onedrivers

Name Size Date Modified
[parent directory]    
3G_GTM380_382_Option_WHQL.zip 31.6 MB 12/3/08 10:56:00 AM
3G_T77Z039_Qualcomm_v1.0.14_WHQL.zip 94.7 MB 12/3/08 10:56:00 AM
Audio_Realtek_272_v5.10.0.5767_WHQL_MIC50_19db_Down3.zip 50.3 MB 12/3/08 10:56:00 AM
Bluetooth_2045_T60H928_5.1.0.4500_XPx32_WHQL.zip 54.6 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
Bluetooth_2045_T60H928_5.1.0.4500_XPx64_WHQL.zip 44.1 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
CCD_Chicony_AP_v1.1.69.1216.zip 2.8 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
CCD_Chincony__DRV_v1.8.0.0_WHQL.zip 4.0 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
CCD_LiteOn_AP.zip 5.3 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
CCD_LiteOn_DRV_v5.8.33.005_WHQL.zip 8.1 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
CCD_Suyin_AP_v2.2.0.2.zip 2.7 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
CCD_Suyin_DRV_v1.0.2.1_WHQL.zip 4.7 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
Cardreader_Realtek_XP_M_6.0.6000.75_WHQL.zip 6.8 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
Chipset_Intel_v.8.3.0.1018_WHQL.zip 2.0 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
Intel Matrix Storage Manager_Intel_v8.0.0.1039_WHQL.zip 6.1 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
KAV10 LaunchManager.12-30-08.v2.0.06_1930.zip 3.3 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
KAV10_XP_Driver_Status_v011A-Jan. 07, 2009.xls 51.5 kB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
LAN_AR8114_v1.0.0.30_WHQL.zip 2.5 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
Touchpad_Synaptics_TM01076-009_v12.2.2.0_WHQL.zip 20.3 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
VGA_Intel_v.6.14.10.4926_WHQL.zip 17.3 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
WLAN_&_Wimax_Intel_Echo Peak_12.1.0.14_WHQL.zip 44.0 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
WLAN_Atheros_XB63_T60H976.11_7.6.0.260_WHQL.zip 5.3 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
WLAN_Broadcom_4312_T77H030_4.170.75.0_WHQL.zip 4.4 MB 12/3/08 10:57:00 AM
Re: (resolved)Acer bluetooth problem

The cheapest way to gain bluetooth on your PC would be to pickup a dongle like this:http://cgi.ebay.ca/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?…MEWN:IT&ih=008
It works well with 1640 🙂